invite

invite, bid, solicit, court, woo are comparable when they mean to request or encourage a person or a thing to come to one or to fall in with one's plans or desires.
Invite in its ordinary and usual sense implies a courteous request to go somewhere, do something, or give some assistance which it is assumed will be agreeable or at least not disagreeable to the person invited
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invite a few friends to dinner

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invite an acquaintance to spend the night

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invite an audience to express their opinions

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he had invited all the girls, including Miss Tolman, to go out with him on various occasions, but . . . everyone declined his offer— Woodfin

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In this sense the word usually implies providing an opening for those who otherwise might hesitate to go, or do, or give without such a request. Consequently, in its extended sense invite implies providing an opening by such means as a seductive manner or a challenging statement or policy that serves as an encouragement or temptation to another
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dress so conspicuously as to invite unwelcome attentions

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fairly imminent collisions invited by the Captain's inept conning— Heggen

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the writer who brings a new revelation is not necessarily called upon to invite the execration of the herd— Ellis

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Bid (see also COMMAND vb) is increasingly uncommon in the sense of to request the presence of (as at a feast or great occasion)
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as many as ye shall find, bid to the marriage— Mt 22:9

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but bid (usually with for), from its sense to offer a price for something up for sale, has developed an extended use in which it means to make an effort to win or attract or an appeal (as for sympathy) and in this use sometimes comes close to invite in conveying the notion of offering a tempting opening for something
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in his difficult position he could not bid for their affection; he wanted only their obedience— Douglas

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stood for Congress in this virgin district, bidding for the support of labor— Green Peyton

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Solicit (see also ASK 2) differs from invite in stressing urgency or need rather than courtesy in requesting or encouraging
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we may come to feel a little impatient at having our pity so continually solicitedEdmund Wilson

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moral utterances which solicit the obedience of children— Melden

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Court basically implies an endeavor to win the favor of a person (as by flattery, attentions, or making love). Only in its extended sense does it imply a providing of a favorable opportunity by tempting or encouraging something to come to one or to happen to one
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he kept himself somewhat aloof, seeming to avoid notice rather than to court it— Arnold

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so long as a scientific textbook is obsolete in a decade or less, to poetize science is to court mortality— Lowes

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Woo basically implies amorous courting; consequently, in its extended sense it frequently stresses a drawing to or upon one by allurements, blandishments, and extravagant promises
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Herodotus in search of a public . . . found a favorable "pitch," as we should say, and wooed an audience to him— Quiller-Couch

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the young author trying to woo his reader, via heavy humor— Keene

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Occasionally the word is very close to court and scarcely distinguishable from it
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you . . . woo your own destruction— Shak.

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Analogous words: *ask, request, solicit: *lure, tempt, entice, inveigle: excite, *provoke, stimulate

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • invite — [ ɛ̃vit ] n. f. • 1767; de inviter 1 ♦ Jeux de cartes, vx Appel. 2 ♦ (fin XIX e) Invitation indirecte plus ou moins déguisée (à faire qqch.). « l invite à la riposte » (Courteline). « C était une invite à le laisser » (A. Gide). Une invite… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • invité — invite [ ɛ̃vit ] n. f. • 1767; de inviter 1 ♦ Jeux de cartes, vx Appel. 2 ♦ (fin XIX e) Invitation indirecte plus ou moins déguisée (à faire qqch.). « l invite à la riposte » (Courteline). « C était une invite à le laisser » (A. Gide). Une invite …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • invite — in‧vite [ɪnˈvaɪt] verb [transitive] 1. to offer someone the opportunity to do something: invite somebody to do something • Contractors will then be invited to tender for the work. • Applications are invited from suitably qualified candidates. •… …   Financial and business terms

  • Invite — In*vite , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Invited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inviting}.] [L. invitare: cf. F. inviter. See {Vie}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To ask; to request; to bid; to summon; to ask to do some act, or go to some place; esp., to ask to an entertainment… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Invite — Жанры металкор электроника Годы 2005 наши дни Страна …   Википедия

  • invite — noun (with the stress on the first syllable). This is a good example of a word that has been in more or less continuous use since the 17c but has not attained the acceptability afforded to its rival, invitation. Dr Johnson must have known it but… …   Modern English usage

  • invité — invité, ée (in vi té, tée) part. passé d inviter. Les personnes invitées au bal. •   Qu invité chez la reine, il ait soin de s y rendre, RAC. Esth. II, 7.    Substantivement. Quel est le nombre des invités ? …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • invite — [in vīt′; ] for n. [ in′vīt΄] vt. invited, inviting [Fr inviter < L invitare < in , IN 1 + ? IE base * wei , to go directly toward, chase after > L via & OE wæthan, to hunt] 1. to ask courteously to come somewhere or do something;… …   English World dictionary

  • Invite — In*vite , v. i. To give invitation. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • invite — index call (appeal to), call (summon), motivate, offer (propose), proffer, request …   Law dictionary

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